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All 107 publications

Sedentary Sphere: wrist-worn accelerometer-brand independent posture classification.

Sedentary Sphere: wrist-worn accelerometer-brand independent posture classification. Rowlands AV, Tates T, Olds TS, Davies M, Khunti K, Edwardson CL. 2015 Nov MSSE Epub ahead of print http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/publishahead/Sedentary_Sphere___Wrist_Worn_Accelerometer_Brand.97657.aspx

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/publishahead/Sedentary_Sphere___Wrist_Worn_Accelerometer_Brand.97657.aspx%20

To evaluate the accuracy of posture classification using the Sedentary Sphere in data from two widely-used wrist-worn triaxial accelerometers.

These data support the efficacy of the Sedentary Sphere for classification of posture from a wrist-worn accelerometer in adults. Importantly, the approach is equally valid with data from both the GENEActiv and ActiGraph accelerometers.

Is the International Physical Activity Questionnaire Long Form (IPAQ) a reliable measure of free-living sedentary behaviour and physical activity in older persons? Comparisons with accelerometer measures.

Is the International Physical Activity Questionnaire Long Form (IPAQ) a reliable measure of free-living sedentary behaviour and physical activity in older persons? Comparisons with accelerometer measures. Ryan D, Wullems JA, Stebbings G, Morse CI, Stewart CE, Onambele-Pearson G. International Scientific Symposium in collaboration with the European Group for Research into Elderly and Physical Activity. ‘The three dimensional effect of physical activity in old age – physical, mental and emotion’. 2015, pp27 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Lovro_Stefan/publication/283855141_PHYSICAL_PHYSIOLOGICAL_AND_PSYCHOLOGICAL_FITNESS_O_F_FREE_LIVING_ACTIVE_AND_NON-ACTIVE_OLDER_FEMALE_ADULTS/links/5648bad908ae451880ae9ac3.pdf

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Lovro_Stefan/publication/283855141_PHYSICAL_PHYSIOLOGICAL_AND_PSYCHOLOGICAL_FITNESS_O_F_FREE_LIVING_ACTIVE_AND_NON-ACTIVE_OLDER_FEMALE_ADULTS/links/5648bad908ae451880ae9ac3.pdf%20

The object of the research was to compare the results of the IPAQ to accelerometer measures of free-living lifestyle patterns. The hypothesis was that both measures would agree in determining SB and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in older people. The aim was to provide a reliable record of the degree of sedentarism and PA in older persons.

 

24 hours of sleep, sedentary behavior and physical activity with nine wearable devices.

24 hours of sleep, sedentary behavior and physical activity with nine wearable devices. Rosenberger ME, Buman MP, Haskell WL, McConnell MV, Carstensen LL. MSSE 2015 (EPub, ahead of print) http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/pages/results.aspx?txtkeywords=rosenberger

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/pages/results.aspx?txtkeywords=rosenberger%20

Getting enough sleep, exercising and limiting sedentary activities can greatly contribute to disease prevention and overall health and longevity. Measuring the full 24-hour activity cycle – sleep, sedentary behavior (SED), light intensity physical activity (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) – may now be feasible using small wearable devices.

A comparison of subjective and objective measures of physical activity from the Newcastle 85+ study

A comparison of subjective and objective measures of physical activity from the Newcastle 85+ study Innerd P, Catt M, Collerton J, Davis K, Trenell M, Kirkwood TBL, Jagger C. Age and Ageing. May 2015 http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/05/26/ageing.afv062.full.pdf+html

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/05/26/ageing.afv062.full.pdf+html%20

Little is known about physical activity (PA) in the very old, the fastest growing age group in the population. The study aimed to examine the convergent validity of subjective and objective measures of PA in adults aged over 85 years.

 

A Novel, Open access method to assess sleep duration using a wrist-worn accelerometer.

A Novel, Open access method to assess sleep duration using a wrist-worn accelerometer. Van Hees VT, Sabia S, Anderson KN, Denton SJ, Oliver J, Catt M, Abell JG, Kivimӓki M, Trennell MI, Singh-Manoux A. PLOSone Nov 2015 DOI:10.1371 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0142533

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0142533%20

Wrist-worn accelerometers are increasingly being used for the assessment of physical activity in population studies, but little is known about their value for sleep assessment. We developed a novel method of assessing sleep duration using data from 4,094 Whitehall II Study (United Kingdom, 2012–2013) participants aged 60–83 who wore the accelerometer for 9 consecutive days, filled in a sleep log and reported sleep duration via questionnaire. Our sleep detection algorithm defined (nocturnal) sleep as a period of sustained inactivity, itself detected as the absence of change in arm angle greater than 5 degrees for 5 minutes or more, during a period recorded as sleep by the participant in their sleep log.

Cross-sectional analysis of weekly levels and patterns of objectively measured physical behaviour with cardiometabolic health in middle-aged adults.

PP74 (poster) Cross-sectional analysis of weekly levels and patterns of objectively measured physical behaviour with cardiometabolic health in middle-aged adults. Dillon CD, Dahly DD, Donnelly AD, Phillips CP. September 2015 J of Epidemiology and Community Health 69 (suppl 1 0 http://jech.bmj.com/content/69/Suppl_1/A84.2.abstract?sid=78dbd66c-a82a-4664-81ed-f8aea0eab88c

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://jech.bmj.com/content/69/Suppl_1/A84.2.abstract?sid=78dbd66c-a82a-4664-81ed-f8aea0eab88c%20

Daily cumulative patterns of objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behaviour by cardiometabolic health status in middle-aged adults; a cross-sectional analysis.

PP75 (poster) Daily cumulative patterns of objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behaviour by cardiometabolic health status in middle-aged adults; a cross-sectional analysis. Dillon CD, Dahly DD, Donnelly AD, Phillips CP. September 2015 J of Epidemiology and Community Health 69 (suppl1) http://jech.bmj.com/content/69/Suppl_1/A84.3.full.pdf+html?sid=68e8c510-9092-40b5-b2f5-e0592d924855

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://jech.bmj.com/content/69/Suppl_1/A84.3.full.pdf+html?sid=68e8c510-9092-40b5-b2f5-e0592d924855%20

An investigation into the effects of different types of exercise on the maintenance of approach motivation levels.

An investigation into the effects of different types of exercise on the maintenance of approach motivation levels. Lowenstein JAS, Wright K, Taylor A, Moberly NJ. 2015 Mental Health and Physical Activity 9 (2015) 24-34 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Joe_Lowenstein/publication/282319946_An_Investigation_into_the_Effects_of_Different_Types_of_Exercise_on_the_Maintenance_of_Approach_Motivation_Levels/links/56124d8f08ae6b29b49e5cb7.pdf

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Joe_Lowenstein/publication/282319946_An_Investigation_into_the_Effects_of_Different_Types_of_Exercise_on_the_Maintenance_of_Approach_Motivation_Levels/links/56124d8f08ae6b29b49e5cb7.pdf%20

This study looked to investigate the interaction between exercise and approach motivation (AM) levels in a non-clinical sample as a step towards investigating the impact of acute exercise upon hypomanic states within Bipolar Disorder.

 

A validation study of the web-based physical activity questionnaire active-Q against the GENEA accelerometer.

A validation study of the web-based physical activity questionnaire active-Q against the GENEA accelerometer. Bonn SE, Bergman P, Lagerros YT, Sjölander A, Bӓlter K. JIMR Res Protoc. 2015 Jul-Sep; 4(3):e86 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4527001/

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4527001/

The objective of the study was to validate the Web-based physical activity questionnaire Active-Q by comparing results of time spent at different physical activity levels with results from the GENEA accelerometer and to assess the reproducibility of Active-Q by comparing two admissions of the questionnaire.

Acceptabilty and efficiacy of a low intensity family-based weight loss intervention.

Acceptabilty and efficiacy of a low intensity family-based weight loss intervention. Benzo RM. 2015. Masters Thesis. The University of Iowa. http://ir.uiowa.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5883&context=etd

 

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://ir.uiowa.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5883&context=etd

Light therapy for better mood and insulin sensitivity in patients with major depression and types 2 diabetes : a randomized, double-blind, parallel-arm trial.

Light therapy for better mood and insulin sensitivity in patients with major depression and types 2 diabetes : a randomized, double-blind, parallel-arm trial. Brouwer A, van Raalte DH, Diamant M, Rutters F, van Someren EJW, Snoek FJ, Beekman ATF, Bremmer MA. BMC Psychiatry 2015, 15:169 http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/s12888-015-0543-5.pdf

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/s12888-015-0543-5.pdf%20

Major depression and type 2 diabetes often co-occur. Novel treatment strategies for depression in type 2 diabetes patients are warranted, as depression in type 2 diabetes patients is associated with poor prognosis and treatment results. Major depression and concurrent sleep disorders have been related to disturbances of the biological clock. The biological clock is also involved in regulation of glucose metabolism by modulating peripheral insulin sensitivity. Light therapy has been shown to be an effective antidepressant that ‘resets’ the biological clock.  The study describes protocol of a study that evaluates the hypothesis that light therapy improves mood as well as insulin sensitivity in patients with a major depressive episode and type 2 diabetes.

 

Cohort profile: Growing up in Wales: The Environments for Healthy Living study.

Cohort profile: Growing up in Wales: The Environments for Healthy Living study. Morgan KL, Khanom A, Hill RA, Lyons RA, Brophy ST. Int J of Epid, 2015, 1-10 https://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/10/01/ije.dyv178.full.pdf+html

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/10/01/ije.dyv178.full.pdf+html%20

Issues and challenges in sedentary behaviour measurement.

Issues and challenges in sedentary behaviour measurement. Kang M, Rowe DA. Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, 19: 105-115 2015 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/1091367X.2015.1055566

 

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/1091367X.2015.1055566

This article (a) provides an overview of the nature and importance of sedentary behavior, (b) describes measurement methods, including subjective and objective measurement tools, (c) reviews the most important measurement and data processing issues and challenges facing sedentary behaviour researchers, and (d) presents key findings from the most recent sedentary behaviour measurement-related research.

 

Using Periodicity intensity to detect Long term behaviour change.

Using Periodicity intensity to detect Long term behaviour change. Hu F, Smeaton AF, Newman E, Buman MP. [email protected] Adjunct. Sept 2015, Osaka http://delivery.acm.org/10.1145/2810000/2800962/p1069-hu.pdf?ip=92.27.135.59&id=2800962&acc=OPEN&key=4D4702B0C3E38B35%2E4D4702B0C3E38B35%2E4D4702B0C3E38B35%2E6D218144511F3437&CFID=719398549&CFTOKEN=45164677&__acm__=1444141442_11e1fce77612e4cdb8d7a50081b17b5d

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://delivery.acm.org/10.1145/2810000/2800962/p1069-hu.pdf?ip=92.27.135.59&id=2800962&acc=OPEN&key=4D4702B0C3E38B35%2E4D4702B0C3E38B35%2E4D4702B0C3E38B35%2E6D218144511F3437&CFID=719398549&CFTOKEN=45164677&__acm__=1444141442_11e1fce77612e4cdb8d7a50081b17b5d%20

Combining behavioural activation with physical activity promotion for adults with depression: findings of a parallel-group pilot randomized controlled trial (BAcPAc)

Combining behavioural activation with physical activity promotion for adults with depression: findings of a parallel-group pilot randomized controlled trial (BAcPAc) Pentecost C, Farrand P, Greaves CJ, Taylor RS, Warren FC, Hillsdon M, Green C, Welsman JR, Rayson K, Evans PH, Taylor AH. Trials 2015 16:367 http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/pdf/s13063-015-0881-0.pdf

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/pdf/s13063-015-0881-0.pdf%20

Depression is associated with physical inactivity, which may mediate the relationship between depression and a range of chronic physical health conditions. However, few interventions have combined a psychological intervention for depression with behaviour change techniques, such as behavioural activation (BA), to promote increased physical activity.

 

Criterion validity and calibration of the GENEActiv accelerometer in adults.

Criterion validity and calibration of the GENEActiv accelerometer in adults. Dillon C, Powell C, Dowd D, Carson B, Donnelly A. Conference paper ICAMPAM June 2015 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Christina_Dillon/publication/278106265_Criterion_validity_and_calibration_of_the_GENEActiv_accelerometer_in_adults/links/55bb49dc08aec0e5f43edde5.pdf

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Christina_Dillon/publication/278106265_Criterion_validity_and_calibration_of_the_GENEActiv_accelerometer_in_adults/links/55bb49dc08aec0e5f43edde5.pdf%20

Wear compliance and activity in children wearing wrist and hip-mounted accelerometers.

Wear compliance and activity in children wearing wrist and hip-mounted accelerometers. Fairclough SJ, Noonan R, Rowlands AV, van Hees V, Knowles Z, Boddy LM. MSSE 2015 Pub ahead of printhttp://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/publishahead/Wear_Compliance_and_Activity_in_Children_Wearing.97696.aspx

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/publishahead/Wear_Compliance_and_Activity_in_Children_Wearing.97696.aspx%20

This study aimed to (i) explore children’s compliance to wearing wrist and hip-mounted accelerometers, (ii) compare children’s physical activity (PA) derived from wrist and hip raw accelerations, and (iii) examine differences in raw and counts PA measured by hip-worn accelerometry.

Sedentary behavior among elite professional footballers: health and performance implications.

Sedentary behavior among elite professional footballers: health and performance implications. Weiler R, Aggio D, Hamer M, Taylor T, Kumar B. BMJ Open Sport Exerc Med 2015 http://bmjopensem.bmj.com/content/1/1/e000023.full.pdf+html

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://bmjopensem.bmj.com/content/1/1/e000023.full.pdf+html%20

New findings:

Whilst exceeding recommended levels of physical activity for health and fitness, professional footballers spend the majority of their leisure time in sedentary activity.

The majority (79%) of waking hours (ex. training/matches) was spent sedentary (500.6 min±59.0 per day).

These levels of sedentariness are far greater than comparable data published on non-athlete and athlete samples of a similar age and body mass index.

 

The effect of knee osteoarthritis on the variability and fractal dynamics of human gait.

The effect of knee osteoarthritis on the variability and fractal dynamics of human gait. Clermont CA, 2015. Thesis. University of Regina 2015 http://ourspace.uregina.ca:8080/handle/10294/5839

 

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://ourspace.uregina.ca:8080/handle/10294/5839

Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease seen in the older adult population, and has a greater influence on gait compared to the effects of aging alone. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between bilateral knee OA and the temporal aspects of gait variability in a group of older adults, and to compare these results to a healthy, age- and sex-matched control group. This study also demonstrated the effectiveness of a tri-axial accelerometer as a non-invasive measurement device to analyze gait variability in older adults with and without bilateral knee OA.

Connecting a National Community of Mothers: Online yoga therapy to reduce PTS symptoms after stillbirth.

Connecting a National Community of Mothers: Online yoga therapy to reduce PTS symptoms after stillbirth. Huberty J, Mitchell J, Matthews J. 2015 Presentation http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.iayt.org/resource/resmgr/docs_sytar2015_handouts/cic1d_mitchell-etal_pts-stil.pdf

 

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.iayt.org/resource/resmgr/docs_sytar2015_handouts/cic1d_mitchell-etal_pts-stil.pdf

Age disparities in the use of cardiovascular medicines: a retrospective cohort analysis of newly treated type 2 diabetes patients.

PP78 Age disparities in the use of cardiovascular medicines: a retrospective cohort analysis of newly treated type 2 diabetes patients. Grimes RT, Bennett K, Henman MC. J of Epidemiology and Community Health 2015 69: suppl 1 A85-A86http://jech.bmj.com/content/69/Suppl_1/A85.2.full.pdf+html

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://jech.bmj.com/content/69/Suppl_1/A85.2.full.pdf+html%20

Real-time personalized monitoring to estimate occupational heat stress in ambient assisted working.

Real-time personalized monitoring to estimate occupational heat stress in ambient assisted working. Pancardo P, Acosta FD, Hernández-Nolasco JA, Wister MA, López-de-Ipiña D. Sensors 2015 15,16956-16980 http://www.mdpi.com/1424-8220/15/7/16956/htm

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.mdpi.com/1424-8220/15/7/16956/htm%20

This paper focuses on the design and development of real-time personalized monitoring for a more effective and objective estimation of Occupational heat stress (OHS), taking into account the individual user profile, fusing data from environmental and unobtrusive body sensors. In this proposal, we found that OHS can be estimated by satisfying the following criteria: objective, personalized, in situ, in real time, just in time and in an unobtrusive way. This enables timely notice for workers to make decisions based on objective information to control OHS.

The role of co-design in wearables adoption.

The role of co-design in wearables adoption. Nevay S, Lim CSC. University of Dundee. BESIDE Research https://www.beside.ac.uk/sites/default/files/NEVAYLIM_EHFUoD15.pdf

 

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.beside.ac.uk/sites/default/files/NEVAYLIM_EHFUoD15.pdf

Ageing and increases in longevity have become increasingly impactful in terms of emerging requirements for our built environments and designers face the challenge of creating enabling homes and spaces that support our changing needs. BESiDE Project at University of Dundee seeks to promote greater mobility, social connectedness and therefore wellbeing through better design. Care home residents are invited to use wearable technology to explore how well older adults living in care homes currently utilise their spaces. Though effective tools for data collection, wearables designed specifically for this age group often fail to engage their wearers. This paper details two co-design workshops with older adults to identify initial design requirements for wearables that meet their specific needs and capabilities. Our findings suggest that successful wearables prioritise comfort, utilize familiar materials and facilitate independent use.

Total worker health intervention increases activity of sedentary workers.

Total worker health intervention increases activity of sedentary workers. Carr L,J, Leonhard C, Tucker S, Fethke N, Benzo R, Gerr F. Am J of Preventive Medicine 2015 http://www.ajpmonline.org/article/S0749-3797(15)00332-3/pdf

 

The study investigates office employees who are exposed to hazardous levels of sedentary work. Interventions that integrate health promotion and health protection elements are needed to advance the health of sedentary workers. This study tested an integrated intervention on occupational sedentary/physical activity behaviors, cardiometabolic disease biomarkers, musculoskeletal discomfort, and work productivity.

Feasibility of three wearable sensors for 24h monitoring in middle-aged women.

Feasibility of three wearable sensors for 24h monitoring in middle-aged women. Huberty J, Ehlers DK, Kurka J, Ainsworth, Buman M. BMC Womens Health (2015)15:55 http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/s12905-015-0212-3.pdf

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/s12905-015-0212-3.pdf%20

The study concludes that twenty-four hour monitoring over seven consecutive days is a feasible approach in middle-aged women. Researchers should consider participant acceptability and demand, in addition to validity and reliability, when choosing a wearable sensor.

 

Objectively measured physical activity and sedentary-time are associated with arterial stiffness in Brazilain young adults.

Objectively measured physical activity and sedentary-time are associated with arterial stiffness in Brazilain young adults. Horta BL, Schaan BD, Bielemann RM, Vianna CÁ, Gigante DP, Barris FC, Ekelund U, Hallal PC. Atherosclerosis September 2015 http://www.atherosclerosis-journal.com/article/S0021-9150(15)30117-9/pdf

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.atherosclerosis-journal.com/article/S0021-9150(15)30117-9/pdf%20

To examine the associations between objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time with pulse wave velocity (PWV) in Brazilian young adults. Conclusions show that physical activity was inversely related to PWV in young adults, whereas sedentary time was positively associated.

 

Project Energise: Using participatory approaches and real time prompts to reduce occupational sitting and increase physical activity in office workers.

Project Energise: Using participatory approaches and real time prompts to reduce occupational sitting and increase physical activity in office workers. Gilson ND, Ng N, Pavey TG , Ryde GC, Straker L, Brown WJ. Proc 19th Triennial Congress of the EIA, Melbourne 9-14 August 2015

 

 

Periodicity-based swimming performance feature extraction and parameter estimation.

Periodicity-based swimming performance feature extraction and parameter estimation. Zhao Y, Gerhard D, Barden J. Sports Engineering July 2015. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12283-015-0178-2

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12283-015-0178-2

This paper presents a novel approach for extracting swimming performance parameters from accelerometer data using techniques traditionally applied to audio analysis. The recorded acceleration data is treated as sampled audio data, with the stroke rate (one of the main parameters to extract) treated as the fundamental frequency. A pitch detection algorithm is then adapted to this domain and applied to the data

The novel use of a SenseCam and accelerometer to validate training load and training information in a self-recall training diary.

The novel use of a SenseCam and accelerometer to validate training load and training information in a self-recall training diary. Connor SO, McCaffrey, Whyte E, Moran K. Journal of Sports Sciences June 2015 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02640414.2015.1050600#.VaZiGnlRHmI

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02640414.2015.1050600#.VaZiGnlRHmI

Self-recall training diaries are a frequently used tool to quantify training load and training information. While accelerometers are predominantly used to validate training diaries, they are unable to validate contextual training information. Thus this study aimed to examine the novel use of data fusion from a wearable camera device (SenseCam) and accelerometer to validate a self-recall training diary.

The speed of our mental soundtracks: Tracking the tempo of involuntary musical imagery in everyday life.

The speed of our mental soundtracks: Tracking the tempo of involuntary musical imagery in everyday life. Jakubowski K, Farrugia N, Halpern AR, Sankarpandi SK, Stewart L June 2015 Memory and Cognition http://link.springer.com/article/10.3758%2Fs13421-015-0531-5

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.3758%2Fs13421-015-0531-5

The study of spontaneous and everyday cognitions is an area of rapidly growing interest. One of the most ubiquitous forms of spontaneous cognition is involuntary musical imagery (INMI), the involuntarily retrieved and repetitive mental replay of music. The present study introduced a novel method for capturing temporal features of INMI within a naturalistic setting. This method allowed for the investigation of two questions of interest to INMI researchers in a more objective way than previously possible, concerning (1) the precision of memory representations within INMI and (2) the interactions between INMI and concurrent affective state.

NMR based biomarkers to study age-related changes in the human quadriceps. Azzabou N, Hogrel JY, Carlier PG. Experimental Gerentology. June 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0531556515300012

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0531556515300012%20

Age-related sarcopenia is a major health issue. To improve elderly person quality of life. It is important to characterize age-associated structural changes within the skeletal muscle. NMR imaging offers quantitative tools to monitor these changes. We scanned 93 subjects. 33 young adults aged between 19 and 27 years old and 60 older adults between 69 and 80 years old. Their physical activity was assessed using a tri-axial accelerometer and they were classified either as active or sedentary. A standard multi-slice multi-echo (MSME) sequence was run and water T2 maps were extracted using a tri-exponential fit. Fat fraction was quantified using three-point Dixon technique. Each quadriceps muscle was characterized by: water T2 mean value. Water T2 heterogeneity and the mean fat fraction.

Behavioural periodicity detection from 24h waveform wrist accelerometry.

Behavioural periodicity detection from 24h waveform wrist accelerometry. Buman MP, Hu F, Newman E, Smeaton AF, Epstein DR June 2015 ICAMPAM poster http://doras.dcu.ie/20643/1/ICAMPAM_2014_Poster_-_ASU_DCU.pdf

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://doras.dcu.ie/20643/1/ICAMPAM_2014_Poster_-_ASU_DCU.pdf

This analytical framework demonstrates a new method for characterizing behavioral patterns that encapsulate behaviors across the 24h spectrum longitudinally.

 

Comparison of raw accelerometry outputs from commercial devices; importance of body position and gait velocity.

Comparison of raw accelerometry outputs from commercial devices; importance of body position and gait velocity. Norris M, Dowd KP, Kenny IC, Donnelly AE. Researchgate.net ICAMPAM 2015 (poster) http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ian_Kenny/publication/277664575_Norris_et_al_(2015)_ICAMPAM_COMPARISON_OF_RAW_ACCELEROMETRY_OUTPUT_FROM_COMMERCIAL_DEVICES_poster/links/556f405308aec226830a64a7.pdf

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ian_Kenny/publication/277664575_Norris_et_al_(2015)_ICAMPAM_COMPARISON_OF_RAW_ACCELEROMETRY_OUTPUT_FROM_COMMERCIAL_DEVICES_poster/links/556f405308aec226830a64a7.pdf

Comparison of raw accelerometry outputs from commercial devices; importance of body position and gait velocity.

The understanding and interpretation of innovative technology-enabled multidimensional physical activity feedback in patients at risk of future chronic disease

The understanding and interpretation of innovative technology-enabled multidimensional physical activity feedback in patients at risk of future chronic disease Western MJ, Peacock OJ, Stathi A, Thompson D PloS One May 2015 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0126156

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0126156

STEPWISE: STructured lifestyle Education for People WIth SchizophrEnia.

STEPWISE: STructured lifestyle Education for People WIth SchizophrEnia. Holt R. April 2015 Research Protocol, University of Southampton, University of Leicester, University of Sheffield.   http://www.nets.nihr.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0019/115561/PRO-12-28-05.pdf

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.nets.nihr.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0019/115561/PRO-12-28-05.pdf

Intervention Development Study

The intervention development study will adapt the NICE approved education programme DESMOND™, to meet the needs of people with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or first episode psychosis. Originally designed for people with or at risk of diabetes the programme has already been adapted for use in minority ethnic groups and people with learning disabilities to help people to change their lifestyle by eating more healthily and exercising more.

 

Classification of physical activity intensities using a wrist-worn accelerometer in 8-12 year old children.

Classification of physical activity intensities using a wrist-worn accelerometer in 8-12 year old children. Chandler JL, Brazendale K, Beets MW, Mealing BA. Pediatric Obesity April 2015 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ijpo.12033/abstract?userIsAuthenticated=false&deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ijpo.12033/abstract?userIsAuthenticated=false&deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=

Results found comparable activity intensity classification accuracies from the ActiGraph GT3X+ wrist-worn accelerometer to previously published studies. Based on ROC and regression analyses, activity intensities can be distilled from this accelerometer using axis 1, axis 2 or VM values with similar classification accuracy.

Mental toughness as a moderator of the intention-behaviour gap in the rehabilitation of knee pain.

Mental toughness as a moderator of the intention-behaviour gap in the rehabilitation of knee pain. Gucciardi DF, Parrish AM, Okely AD. 2015 J of Sci and Med in sport

Hand hygiene duration and technique recognition using wrist-worn sensors.

Hand hygiene duration and technique recognition using wrist-worn sensors. Galluzzi V, Herman T, Polgreen P, IPSN 2015 (Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Information Processing in Sensor Networks) http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2737106

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2737106

Hand washing is an effective countermeasure to the spread of many types of infection. Recently, sensing technology has automated the sampling and study of hand hygiene rates. Surprisingly, many questions about the area are unresolved, motivating further exploration based on wrist-worn commodity sensors (accelerometer and MEMS gyroscope). This paper describes initial work on techniques for measuring the duration of washing events and classifying different scrubbing motions. The work compares different sensor types and their fusion, compares sensing from one wrist to measuring both wrists, and explains results of experiments on a range of hand washing motions in a variety of subject populations, some in clinics of a teaching hospital. Machine learning is used to explore such questions: the paper investigates numerous features extracted from sensor data, looking at sampling rates, windowing, and platform details that affect classification. In training and classification experiments, data collection starts on the wrist, activated by a message from a disinfectant dispenser; data is then transferred by radio to a base station for subsequent reduction, analysis and characterization. Results show that hand hygiene motions can be classified with up to 93% accuracy.

Classification of accelerometer wear and non-wear events in seconds for monitoring free-living physical activity.

Classification of accelerometer wear and non-wear events in seconds for monitoring free-living physical activity. Zhou SM, Hill RA, Morgan K, Stratton G , Gravenor MB, Bijlsma G, Brophy S. BMJ April 2015 http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/5/5/e007447.full.pdf+html

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/5/5/e007447.full.pdf+html

The objective is to classify wear and non-wear time of accelerometer data for accurately quantifying physical activity in public health or population level research. A bi-moving-window-based approach was used to combine acceleration and skin temperature data to identify wear and non-wear time events in triaxial accelerometer data that monitor physical activity.

Healthy obesity and objective physical activity.

Healthy obesity and objective physical activity. Bell JA, Hamer M, van Hees VT , Singh-Manoux, A, Kivimӓki, Sabia S. Am Soc for Nut 2015 http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/early/2015/07/08/ajcn.115.110924.abstract

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/early/2015/07/08/ajcn.115.110924.abstract

Higher total physical activity in healthy than in unhealthy obese adults is evident only when measured objectively, which suggests that physical activity has a greater role in promoting health among obese populations than previously thought.

Influence of accelerometer type and placement on physical activity energy expenditure prediction in manual wheelchair users.

Influence of accelerometer type and placement on physical activity energy expenditure prediction in manual wheelchair users. Nightingale TE, Walhin JP, Thompson D, Bilzon JLJ. PloS one 2015 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4425541/

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4425541/

The purpose of this study is to assess the validity of two accelerometer devices, at two different anatomical locations, for the prediction of physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) in manual wheelchair users.

A cluster randomized controlled trial to investigate the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of the ‘Girls Active’ intervention: a study protocol.

A cluster randomized controlled trial to investigate the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of the ‘Girls Active’ intervention: a study protocol. Edwardson CL, Harrington DM, Yates T, Bodicoat DH, Khunti K, Gorely T, Sherar LB, Edwards RT, Wright C, Harrington K, Davies MJ. BMC Public Health 2015 15:526. http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/15/526/

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/15/526/

The findings of this study will provide valuable information on whether this type of school-based approach to increasing physical activity in adolescent girls is both effective and cost-effective in the UK.

Effect of a program of short bouts of exercise on bone health in adolescents involved in different sports: the PRO-BONE study.

Effect of a program of short bouts of exercise on bone health in adolescents involved in different sports: the PRO-BONE study. Vlachopoulos D, Barker AR, Williams CA, Knapp KM, Metcalf BS, Gracia-Marco L. BMC Public Health. (2015) 15:361 http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/s12889-015-1633-5.pd

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/s12889-015-1633-5.pd

Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease associated with high morbidity, mortality and increased economic costs. Early prevention during adolescence appears to be one of the most beneficial practices. Exercise is an effective approach for developing bone mass during puberty, but some sports may have a positive or negative impact on bone mass accrual. Plyometric jump training has been suggested as a type of exercise that can augment bone, but its effects on adolescent bone mass have not been rigorously assessed. The aims of the PRO-BONE study are to: 1) longitudinally assess bone health and its metabolism in adolescents engaged in osteogenic (football), non-osteogenic (cycling and swimming) sports and in a control group, and 2) examine the effect of a 9 month plyometric jump training programme on bone related outcomes in the sport groups.

 

The validity of the GENEActiv wrist-worn accelerometer for measuring adult sedentary time in free living.

The validity of the GENEActiv wristworn accelerometer for measuring adult sedentary time in free living. Pavey TG, Gomersall SR, Clark BK, Brown WJ. J of Sci and Med in Sport. April 2015 http://www.jsams.org/article/S14402440(15)000894/abstract 

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.jsams.org/article/S1440-2440(15)00089-4/abstract%20

Exercise intensity and the protection from postprandial vascular dysfunction in adolescents.

Exercise intensity and the protection from postprandial vascular dysfunction in adolescents. Bond B, Gates PE, Jackman S, Corless L, Williams CA, Barker AR. Am J of Phys Heart and Circulatory Phys.  March 2015. http://ajpheart.physiology.org/content/early/2015/03/25/ajpheart.00074.2015 

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://ajpheart.physiology.org/content/early/2015/03/25/ajpheart.00074.2015%20

Physical activity and adiposity markers at older ages: Accelerometer versus Questionnaire data.

Physical activity and adiposity markers at older ages: Accelerometer versus Questionnaire data. Sabia S, Cogranne P, van Hees VT, Bell JA, Elbaz A, Kivimaki M, SinghManoux A. JAMDA, 2015 e1e7 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1525861015000936  

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1525861015000936%20%20

Rationale and study protocol for ‘Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds’ (S4HM): A cluster randomized controlled trial to reduce recreational screen time in adolescents.

Rationale and study protocol for ‘Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds’ (S4HM): A cluster randomized controlled trial to reduce recreational screen time in adolescents. Babic MJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lonsdale C, Eather N, Skinner G, Baker AL, Pollock E, Lubans DR. Contemporary Clin Trials.  40 (2015) 150-158 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1551714414001864 

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1551714414001864%20%20

Cohort Profile update: The 1982 Pelotas (Brazil) birth cohort study.

Cohort Profile update: The 1982 Pelotas (Brazil) birth cohort study. Horta BL, Gigante DP, Goncalves H, dos Santos Motta JV, de Mola CL, Oliveira IO, Barros FC, Victoria CG. Int J of Epid, 2015, 1-6 http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/03/01/ije.dyv017.full.pdf+html

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/03/01/ije.dyv017.full.pdf+html%20

  • It is possible to recruit a population-based cohort and achieve high follow-up rates after 30 years in a middle-income setting
  • The existence of three other younger birth cohorts in the same population allows the evaluation of time trends in health indicators
  • In a cohort where undermutrition was common in early life, extremely high prevalence of overweight and obesity are observed at the age of 30 years

 

Validation of two accelerometers to determine mechanical loading of physical activities in children.

Validation of two accelerometers to determine mechanical loading of physical activities in children. Meyer U, Ernst D, Schott S, Riera C, Hettendorf J, Romkes J, Granacher U, Gopfert B, Kriemler S. J Sports Sci. 2015. Jan 26:1-8 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02640414.2015.1004638?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed&#.VP2BpHmzXmI

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02640414.2015.1004638?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed&#.VP2BpHmzXmI%20

The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of accelerometers using force plates (i.e., ground reaction force (GRF)) during the performance of different tasks of daily physical activity in children

Patient self-management in primary care patients with mild COPD – protocol of a randomized controlled trial of telephone health coaching.

Patient self-management in primary care patients with mild COPD – protocol of a randomized controlled trial of telephone health coaching. Sidhu MS, Daley A, Jordan R, Coventry PA, Heneghan C, Jowett S, Singh S, Marsh J, Adab P, Varghese J, Nunan D, Blakemore A, Stevens J, Dowson L, Fitzmaurice D, Jolly K. BMC Pulmonary Medicine, 2015 15:16 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2466/15/16

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2466/15/16%20

The prevalence of diagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the UK is 1.8%, although it is estimated that this represents less than half of the total disease in the population as much remains undiagnosed. Case finding initiatives in primary care will identify people with mild disease and symptoms. The majority of self-management trials have identified patients from secondary care clinics or following a hospital admission for exacerbation of their condition. This trial will recruit a primary care population with mild symptoms of COPD and use telephone health coaching to encourage self-management.

Package GGIR.

Package GGIR. van Hees VT, Fang Z, Zhao JH, Sabia S CRAN Feb 2015 http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/GGIR/index.html

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/GGIR/index.html%20

A tool to process and analyse data collected with wearable raw acceleration sensors. The package has been developed and tested for binary data from GENEActiv and GENEA devices and .csv-export data from Actigraph devices. These devices are currently widely used in research on human daily physical activity.

Energy expenditure prediction using raw accelerometer data in simulated free-living.

Energy expenditure prediction using raw accelerometer data in simulated free-living. Montoye AHK, Mudd LM, Biswas S, Pfeiffer A. MSSE 2015 EPub ahead of print http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/publishahead/Energy_Expenditure_Prediction_Using_Raw.97844.aspx

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/publishahead/Energy_Expenditure_Prediction_Using_Raw.97844.aspx%20

The purpose of this study was to develop, validate, and compare energy expenditure prediction models for accelerometers placed on the hip, thigh, and wrists using simple accelerometer features as input variables in energy expenditure prediction models.

Rural Environments and Community Health (REACH): a randomized controlled trial protocol for an online walking intervention in rural adults.

Rural Environments and Community Health (REACH): a randomized controlled trial protocol for an online walking intervention in rural adults. Mitchell BL, Lewis NR, Smith AE, Rowlands AV, Parfitt G, Dollman J. BMC Public Health, 2014, 14:969 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/14/969

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/14/969%20

Rural Australian adults are continually shown to be insufficiently active with higher prevalence of lifestyle-related diseases associated with physical inactivity compared to urban adults. This may, partly, be attributable to the challenges associated with implementing community-based physical activity programs in rural communities. There is a need for broadly accessible physical activity programs specifically tailored to the unique attributes of rural communities. The aim of the Rural Environments And Community Health (REACH) study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an online-delivered physical activity intervention for increasing regular walking among adults living in rural areas of South Australia.

OP66 Multilevel influences on overweight and obesity in 8-11 year old Irish children: findings from the Cork Children’s Lifestyle Study (CCLaS). (Abstract)

OP66 Multilevel influences on overweight and obesity in 8-11 year old Irish children: findings from the Cork Children’s Lifestyle Study (CCLaS). (Abstract) J Epidmiol Community Health 2014;68:A34 http://jech.bmj.com/content/68/Suppl_1/A34.1.abstract

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://jech.bmj.com/content/68/Suppl_1/A34.1.abstract%20

Globally, the high prevalence of childhood obesity is recognised as a significant public health problem associated with adverse health consequences. Thus, a comprehensive understanding of this multifaceted problem is necessary to inform effective public health strategies. We aim to assess modifiable individual factors associated with childhood overweight and obesity whilst considering broader contextual factors including the home and local environment

Non-consent to a wrist-worn accelerometer in older adults: The role of socio-demographic, behavioural and health factors. Hassani M, Kivimaki M, Elbaz A, Shipley M, Singh-Manoux A, Sabia S. PLOS one vol 9, Issue 10, e110816 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0110816

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0110816%20

Accelerometers, initially waist-worn but increasingly wrist-worn, are used to assess physical activity free from reporting-bias. However, its acceptability by study participants is unclear. Our objective is to assess factors associated with non-consent to a wrist-mounted accelerometer in older adults.

The Dynamics of Ageing. Evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing 2002-2012 (Wave 6).

The Dynamics of Ageing. Evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing 2002-2012 (Wave 6). Editors Banks J, Nazroo J, Steptoe A. Institute for Fiscal Studies. October 2014 http://www.elsa-project.ac.uk/publicationDetails/id/7411

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.elsa-project.ac.uk/publicationDetails/id/7411%20%20

The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing is a multidisciplinary study of a large representative sample of men and women aged 50 and over living in England. ELSA was designed to understand the dynamics of ageing as people move through their later years and the relationships between demographic factors, economic circumstances, social and psychological factors, health, cognitive function and biology. The study began in 2002 and the sample is re-examined every two years. This report details the sixth wave of data collection, which was carried out in 2012–13. Wave 6 of ELSA involved both the standard face-to-face interview conducted in every wave and a nurse visit during which functional capacity, physiological measures and biomarkers were assessed.

Sedentary behavior and physical activity among older patients following percutaneous coronary intervention presented with stable angina versus acute coronary syndrome. (Abstract)

Sedentary behavior and physical activity among older patients following percutaneous coronary intervention presented with stable angina versus acute coronary syndrome. (Abstract) Denton SJ, van Hees VT, Bawamia B, Veerasamy M, Quinn L, Dunford JR, Trenell MI, Jakovljevic DG, Kunadian V. Circulation 2014; 130:A13125 http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/130/Suppl_2/A13125.abstract?sid=c1a96bdd-ba1b-4f04-aba7-1de356653527http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/130/Suppl_2.toc

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/130/Suppl_2/A13125.abstract?sid=c1a96bdd-ba1b-4f04-aba7-1de356653527http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/130/Suppl_2.toc

A wide variety of exercise regimes produce significant reductions in coronary artery disease (CAD) risk and modulate the pathogenesis of CAD. Given the ongoing burden of cardiovascular disease and an aging population, physical activity (PA) in patients with CAD needs to be emphasized in addition to the use of advanced therapeutic and pharmacological interventions in their management. It is not known whether PA levels differ among older patients following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable angina (SA) vs. acute coronary syndrome (ACS) consisting of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non STEMI (NSTEMI).

Limits of the correlation of wrist-worn accelerometry with oxygen uptake (Abstract)

Sirichana W, Sail K, Taylor M, Wang X, Barjaktarvic I, Kleerup EC, Cooper CB. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2014, 189 A6271

www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1164/ajrccm-conference.2014.189.1_MeetingAbstracts.A6271

Tri-axial accelerometry has been widely used to measure movement especially in sports. Anticipating a correlation between body movement and oxygen uptake (Vo2) we can perhaps use accelerometers to indirectly measure Vo2 or to quantify physical activities in terms of metabolic equivalents (METs). The aim was to test the reliability of a tri-axial accelerometer in the measurement of Vo2 over a range of daily physical activities.

Physical activity levels in three Brazilian birth cohorts as assessed with raw triaxial wrist acceleromentry.

Da Silva ICM, van Hees VT, Ramires VV, Knuth AG, Bielemann RM, Ekelund U, Brage S, Hallal PC. Int J of Epid, 2014 1959-1968 http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/43/6/1959.full.pdf+html

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/43/6/1959.full.pdf+html

Data on objectively measured physical activity are lacking in low- and middle-income countries. The aim of this study was to describe objectively measured overall physical activity and time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in individuals from the Pelotas (Brazil) birth cohorts, according to weight status, socioeconomic status (SES) and sex.

 

Acute affective responses to prescribed and self-selected exercise sessions in adolescent girls: an observational study.

Hamlyn-Williams CC, Freeman P, Parfitt G. BMC Sports Sci, Med and rehab. 2014 6:35 http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/2052-1847-6-35.pdf

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/2052-1847-6-35.pdf

Positive affective responses can lead to improved adherence to exercise. This study sought to examine the affective responses and exercise intensity of self-selected exercise in adolescent girls.

 

Cadence, Peak vertical acceleration, and peak loading rate during ambulatory activities: implications for activity prescription for bone health.

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.humankinetics.com/jpah-current-issue/jpah-volume-11-issue-7-september/cadence-peak-vertical-acceleration-and-peak-loading-rate-during-ambulatory-activities-implications-for-activity-prescription-for-bone-health

Objective: To examine relationships between cadence, peak vertical acceleration and peak loading rate during ambulation and identify the cadence associated with previously reported bone-beneficial thresholds for peak vertical acceleration (4.9 g) and peak loading rate (43 BW/s).

The validity of the GENEActiv wrist-worn accelerometer for measuring sedentary behaviour in free living.

Pavey T, Gomersall S, Clark B, Waryouni F, Brown W. J Sci and Med in Sport Dec 2014 18 supp1 e34 http://www.jsams.org/article/S1440-2440(14)00429-0/abstract

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.jsams.org/article/S1440-2440(14)00429-0/abstract

Sedentary time is suggested to be harmfully associated with mortality and chronic disease. This evidence is mainly drawn from self-reported measures of sedentary behaviour. This study examined the criterion validity of the GENEActiv accelerometer for estimating sedentary time in daily free living.

Glucose metabolism in healthy ageing.

Wijsman CA. PhD thesis. 2014 Leiden University. Netherlands

Dose-response Effects of a Web-based physical activity program on body composition and metabolic health in inactive adults: Additional analyses of a randomized controlled trial.

Vroege DP, Wijsman CA, Broekhuizen, de Craen AJM, van Heemst D, van der Ouderaa FJG, van Mechelen W, Slagboom PE, Catt M, Westendorp RGJ, Verhagen EALM, Mooijaart. J Med Internet Res Dec 2014; 16(12):e265 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4275504/?report=printable

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4275504/?report=printable

The goal of this paper was to assess how many participants successfully reached the physical activity level as targeted by the intervention and what the effects of the intervention on body composition and metabolic health in these successful individuals were to provide insight in the maximum attainable effect of the intervention.

Wearable tech lets boss track your work, rest and play.

New Scientist Oct 2014. Aviva Rutkin

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22429913.000-wearable-tech-lets-boss-track-your-work-rest-and-play.html?full=true#.VLZqyXmzXmI%20

Chris Brauer of Goldsmiths, University of London, asked employees at London media agency Mindshare to wear one of three different activity trackers as they worked: an accelerometer wristband, a portable brainwave monitor or a posture coach. After a month, productivity had risen by 8.5 per cent and job satisfaction by 3.5 per cent overall. Most improvement was seen in employees who wore passive devices that collected data quietly rather than interrupting with ongoing feedback. “People recognise that effectively they’re on the clock, that they’re being tracked, and as a result they raise their game,” says Brauer.

Diet, physical activity, lifestyle behaviours, and prevalence of childhood obesity in Irish children: the Cork Children’s Lifestyle Study Protocol.

Keane E, Kearney PM, Perry IJ, Browne GM, Harrington JM. JMIR Res Protoc 2014 3(3) e44

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4147704/?report=printable%20

Childhood obesity is complex, and its aetiology is known to be multifaceted. The contribution of lifestyle behaviors, including poor diet and physical inactivity, to obesity remains unclear. Due to the current high prevalence, childhood obesity is an urgent public health priority requiring current and reliable data to further understand its aetiology.

The objective of this study is to explore the individual, family, and environmental factors associated with childhood overweight and obesity, with a specific focus on diet and physical activity. A secondary objective of the study is to determine the average salt intake and distribution of blood pressure in Irish children.

A cross-sectional survey was conducted of children 8-11 years old in primary schools in Cork, Ireland. Urban schools were selected using a probability proportionate to size sampling strategy, and a complete sample of rural schools from one area in Cork County were invited to participate. Information collected included physical measurement data (anthropometric measurements, blood pressure), early morning spot and 24 hour urine samples, a 3 day estimated food diary, and 7 days of accelerometer data.

Auto-calibration of accelerometer data for free-living physical activity assessment using local gravity and temperature: an evaluation on four continents.

van Hees VT, Fang Z, Langford J, Assah F, Mohammed A, da Silva ICM, Trenell MI, White T, Wareham NJ, Brage S. J App Physiol August 2014

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://jap.physiology.org/content/early/2014/07/31/japplphysiol.00421.2014

Wearable acceleration sensors are increasingly used for the assessment of free-living physical activity. Acceleration sensor calibration is a potential source of error. This study aims to describe and evaluate an auto-calibration method to minimize calibration error using segments within the free-living records (no extra experiments needed).

Conclusions: The auto-calibration method as presented helps reduce the calibration error in wearable acceleration sensor data and improves comparability of physical activity measures across study locations. Temperature utilisation seems essential when temperature deviates substantially from the average temperature in the record, but not for multiday summary measures.

Comparison of measured acceleration output from accelerometry-based activity monitors.

Rowlands AV, Fraysse F, Catt M, Stiles VH, Stanley RM, Eston RG, Olds TS. MSSE 2014 Published ahead of print

Comparability of Measured Acceleration from Accelerometry-Based Activity Monitors.

Rowlands AV, Fraysse F, Catt M, Stiles VH, Stanley RM, Eston RG, Olds TS. MSSEMay 2014 (Epub ahead of print)

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/publishahead/Comparability_of_Measured_Acceleration_from.98033.aspx

This study investigated the equivalence of output for GENEActiv and Actigraph GT3X both worn at the hip. Thirty eight adults performed 9 laboratory-based activities and Fifty-eight children wore the units in a free living setting for 7 days. The study examined multiple time and frequent domains from contemporaneous output from the GENEActiv and GT3X across a variety of specified activities. The second part of the study assed whether the magnitude and pattern of accelerations from the GENEActiv and GT3X during free living agreed and/or were related.

The magnitude of time domain features from the GENEActiv was greater than from the GT3X, however, frequency domain features compared well, with perfect agreement of the domain frequency for 97-100% of participants for most activities. The Mean daily acceleration measured by the two devices was correlated (r=0.93), but the magnitude was around 15% lower for the GT3X than the GENEActiv at the hip.

The authors conclude that the strong relationship between accelerations measured by the 2 brands suggest habitual activity level and activity patterns assessed by the GENEActiv and GT3X may compare well if analysed appropriately.

Effects of breathing on hip roll asymmetry in competitive front crawl swimming.

Barber MV, Barden JM. Proceedings of BMS 2014

This study was designed to determine the effect of breathing on body roll angle, specifically hip role, in elite front crawl swimmers. More specifically, the extent to which hip roll angle and hip roll asymmetry differed between unilateral and bilateral breathing conditions was investigated. Twenty competitive swimmers wore a GENEActiv on the back at the L5/S1 vertebrae, with the x-axis in line with the spine. Participants performed 3 x 100m front crawl repetitions. No significant defence was found for time taken to complete the trials, and no difference for Hip Roll angle. The peak hip roll angle was significantly greater to the breathing side compared to the non-breathing side in the preferred, non-preferred and bilateral positions. This supports the idea that bilateral breathing is beneficial and can reduce hip roll asymmetry. This study also presents the practical application of the GENEActiv in competitive swimming.

Children’s Physical Activity Assessed with Wrist- and Hip-Worn Accelerometers.

Rowlands AV, Rennie K, Kozarski R, Stanley RM, Eston RG, Parfitt GC, Olds TS. MSSE. Apr 28 2014. (Epub ahead of print)

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/publishahead/Children_s_Physical_Activity_Assessed_With_Wrist_.98061.aspx%20

The purpose of this study was to assess the concurrent validity measures of total activity and time spent at different activity intensities from the GENEActiv, relative to the Actigraph GT3X in children. Fifty eight children aged 10-12 yrs. wore a GENEActiv and GT3x on the hip and a GENEActiv on the wrist for seven days. Data were also compared to standardised, comparable uniaxial Actigraph data, which are available on the physical activity levels of 32000 children from the International Children’s Accelerometry Database (ICAD).

Mean daily accelerometer output, time spent sedentary and time in moderate to vigorous physical activity from both the hip and wrist worn GENEActiv were strongly correlated with the corresponding output from the GT3X (r>0.83). Less time was estimated to be sedentary by the GENEActiv (Phillips cut points), with more time categorised as MVPA than when using Everson vertical axis cut points for the GT3x. Mean output from the GT3X showed greater day to day variability then the GENEActiv.

They conclude that time spent sedentary or in MVPA can be estimated by the GENEActiv and is comparable to uniaxial Actigraph. Actigraph output can be predicted from the hip or waist-worn GENEActiv fro group level comparisons.

The Human Cloud at Work; a Study into the Impact of Wearable Technologies in the Workplace.

2014. Rackspace

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.rackspace.co.uk/sites/default/files/Human%20Cloud%20at%20Work.pdf

This is a report describing how wearable technologies have an increasing role to play in improving productivity and job satisfaction, potentially changing how we work. With so much data being produced it is now a major IT challenge for companies, which may be best overcome using some form of cloud. Individuals are used to sharing data via smartphones and other devices they are more relaxed about the ‘Big Brother’ aspects of wearable technology in the workplace.

The report discusses work done at Goldsmiths University of London in March 2014 in a study 0f 120 employees, who wore GENEActiv as one of their devices. Output from the devices contributed to the employees Performance AT Work (PAW) scores. 50% of those wearing a GENEActiv reported increased PAW.

Physical Activity and Excess Weight in Pregnancy Have Independent and Unique Effects on Delivery and Perinatal Outcomes.

Morgan KL, Rahman MA, Hill RA, Zhou SM, Bijlsma G, Khanom A, Lyons RA, Brophy S. PLOSone April 10, 2014

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0094532

This study examined the effect of low daily physical activity levels and overweight/obesity in pregnancy on delivery and perinatal outcomes. Data were collected on 466 women in Wales. Physical activity was measured for 7 days by wrist-worn GENEActiv, on 1second epoch at 100 Hz and waist worn Actigraph GT3x on step counts on a 1sec epoch at a rate of 30 Hz. Mothers with lower physical activity levels were found to be more likely to have an instrumental delivery in comparison to mothers with higher activity. The type of delivery was associated with maternal physical activity and not BMI.

Establishing and Evaluating Wrist Cutpoints for the GENEActiv Accelerometer in Youth.

Schaefer CA, Nigg CR, Hill JO, Brink LA, Browning RC. MSSE April 2014; 46(4) 826-33

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Fulltext/2014/04000/Establishing_and_Evaluating_Wrist_Cutpoints_for.24.aspx%20

The purpose of this investigation was to establish physical activity cutpoints for a wrist-mounted GENEActiv in children aged 6-11 yrs. and to apply cut-points to a free-living sample and examine duration of physical activity based on continuous 1 s epochs. Data were collected for 9 activities, along with metabolic data. GENEActiv data were collected at 75Hz. ROC curves were used to establish cutpoints. The cutpoints were applied to a free-living independent data set. ROC yielded areas under the curve of 0.956, 0.946 and 0940 for sedentary, moderate and vigorous intensities respectively. Classification activities raged from 27% (light) to 88.7% (vigorous) when the cut-points were applied to the calibration data. When applied to free-living data, estimated moderate/vigorous physical activity was 308 minutes and decreased to 14.3 minutes when only including 1min periods of continuous MVPA.

When the generated cut-points were applied to a laboratory protocol resulted in large amounts of accumulated MVPA using 1s epochs compared to prior studies. This highlights the need for representative calibration activities and free-living validation cutpoints and also highlights the importance of epoch length selection.

Association Between Questionnaire- and Accelerometer- Assessed Physical Activity: The Role of Sociodemographic Factors.

Sabia S, van Hees VT, Martin J, Shipley MI, Hagger-Johnson G, Elbaz A, Kivimaki M, Singh-Manoux A. Am J of Epidemiology Feb 2014

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/02/04/aje.kwt330.full.pdf+html%20

The correlations between objective measures for physical activity and self-report differs between studies. This paper presents and investigation into this association and whether it differed by demographic factors of socioeconomic status (SES). Data were collected from the nearly 4000 subjects in the Whitehall II study in participants aged 60-83 years. Subjects completed physical activity questionnaires and wore a GENEActiv accelerometer for 9 days on the wrist. There was a correlation of r=0.33 between the questionnaire and GENEActiv assessed physical activity. The correlations were higher in the higher SES group as defined by education or occupational position, but did not differ by age, sex or marital status. Self-reported physical activity was more strongly associated with GENEActiv data for more energetic activities. High SES individuals reported more energetic activities. Physical activity is seen to be key in successful ageing, and understanding its impact on all age groups is fundamentally important and accurate measurement must be considered to obtain maximal benefits on health outcomes.

A Smartphone Intervention for Adolescent Obesity: Study Protocol for a Randomised Controlled Non-inferiority Trial.

O’ Malley G, Clarke M, Burls A, Murphy S, Murphy N, Perry IJ. Trials2014 15:43

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1745-6215-15-43.pdf

This is an outline protocol designed to assess the impact of a smartphone application compared with standard care on body mass index standardized deviation score after a 12 month obesity reduction programme for adolescents (aged 12-17 yrs.). The study will take place in Dublin. One measurement to be included within the study is 7 days objective measurement of physical activity using the GENEActiv, this will be compared to subjective scores.

Age-group comparability of raw accelerometers output from wrist- and hip-worn monitors.

Hildebrand M, Van Hees VT, Hansen BH, Ekelund U MSSE Jan 2014 Published ahead of print

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/publishahead/Age_Group_Comparability_of_Raw_Accelerometer.98144.aspx

This study aimed to compare raw data tri-accelerometer output from GENEActiv and Actigraph GT3X when placed on the wrist and hip and to develop regression equations for estimating energy expenditure in children (aged 7-11yr) and adults (aged 18-65yr). The subjects completed 8 activities ranging from lying to running whilst wearing GENEActiv and GT3x on the wrist and hip. There was greater acceleration measured from the wrist than the hip, with no effect of device brand. Both brands and body placements showed a strong correlation with maximal oxygen uptake. The intensity classification accuracy of the developed thresholds for both brands and placements were generally higher for adults, compared to children and were greater for sedentary/light (93-97%) and vigorous activities (68-92%), than moderate activities (33-59%). They conclude that output from GENEActiv and GT3x are comparable for adults, but there are some non-consistent difference between the brands for children.

Cross-validation of Waist-Worn GENEA Accelerometer Cut-points

Welch WA, Bassett DR, Freedson PS, John D, Steeves JA, Conger SA, Ceaser TG, Howe CA, Sasaki JE MSSE Jan 2014 Published Ahead of print

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/publishahead/Cross_validation_of_Waist_Worn_GENEA_Accelerometer.98167.aspx%20

The purpose of this study was to assess classification accuracy of the old style GENEA (as opposed to the current GENEActiv) when the device was worn on the waist. Participants performed a range of activities whilst wearing the GENEA and wearing a mobile Oxycon unit to measure oxygen uptake. Activities the participants were asked to complete included 7 out of filing papers, vacuuming, self-paced walking, treadmill walking (6.4 km/h, or 4.8 km/h), cycling (49 watts or 98 watts), basketball, treadmill running (9.6 km/h), computer work, moving a box, tennis, treadmill walking on a 5% gradient. This paper claims a classification accuracy of 55.3%, compared to 95% in the Esliger validation paper. Waist-mounted studies tend to underestimate upper body movements. Wrist mounted GENEA provided a more accurate classification of sports activities, e.g. tennis and basketball.

A guide to assessing physical activity using accelerometry in cancer patients

Broderick JM, Ryan J, O’Donnell, Hussey J. Support Care Cancer 2014 Apr;22(4):1121-30 Doi 10.1007/s00520-013-2102-2

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00520-013-2102-2%20

This paper provides a guide to different accelerometers commercially available and suggests that they are useful tools for measuring physical activity in clinical trial research within cancer. Physical activity is an important outcome measure in rehabilitation interventions with cancer and may be used as a proxy measure of recovery or deterioration in health status.

Taking up physical activity in later life and healthy ageing: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

Hamer M, Lavoie KL, Bacon SL. Br J Sports Med 2014 48:239-243 Doi: 0.1136/bjsports-2013-092993

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/48/3/239.full.pdf+html

This publication presents how sustained physical activity in older age is associated with improved health outcomes. Even participants who were inactive but became physically active later in life demonstrated significant health benefits. In this paper the research team state that they validated their traditional physical activity questionnaires in 116 ELSA participants using objective data collection via GENEActiv. The GENEActiv device was worn on the wrist for even consecutive days. This proportion of their data is currently unpublished.

Cross-validation of Waist-Worn GENEA Accelerometer Cut-Points

Welch WA, Bassett DR, Freedson PS, John D, Steeves JA, Conger SA, Ceaser TG, Howe CA, Sasaki JE MSSE Jan 2014 Published Ahead of print

Age-group comparability of raw accelerometers output from wrist- and hip-worn monitors

Hildebrand M, Van Hees VT, Hansen BH, Ekelund U MSSE Jan 2014 Published ahead of print

Effects of moderate to vigorous-intensity physical activity on nocturnal and next day hypoglycemia in adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

Kristen Marie Metcalf submitted for Master of Science. University of Iowa, Department Integrative Physiology. 2013

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://ir.uiowa.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4709&context=etd

Spectral Analysis of Accelerometric Data to identify human movement patterns

Patrick Wohlfahrt, submitted for Bachelor thesis, Martin-Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Physics. 8th August 2012

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.physik.uni-halle.de/Fachgruppen/kantel/Bachelorarbeit_Wohlfahrt.pdf%20

Use of Accelerometry to predict energy expenditure in military tasks

Fleur Horner, submitted for Doctor of Philosophy, University of Bath. Department for Health. November 2012

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://opus.bath.ac.uk/32444/1/UnivBath_PhD_2012_FE_Horner.pdf%20

Validation of the GENEA Accelerometer

Esliger DW, Rowlands AV, Hurst TL, Catt M, Murray P, and Eston RG. Med Sci Sport Exerc. 2011; Jun;43(6):1085-93

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/2011/06000/Validation_of_the_GENEA_Accelerometer.22.aspx

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This paper introduces GENEA to the scientific community and presents an assessment of the technical reliability and validity of the GENEA and GENEA calibration and develops thresholds for sedentary and light, moderate and vigorous intensity physical activity. These intensity classifications are compared against Actigraph and RT3 accelerometers.

The GENEA showed 1.4% intra variability and 2.1% inter variability. VO2 was used as the criterion validity and both wrist-worn and waist-worn GENEA compared well to the Actigraph and RT3. It was concluded that the GENEA is a valid and reliable tool for classifying physical activity in adults.

Estimation of Daily Energy Expenditure in Pregnant and Non-Pregnant Women Using a Wrist-Worn Tri-Axial Accelerometer

van Hees VT, Renström F, Wright A, Gradmark A, Catt M, Chen KY, LÖf M, Bluck L, Pomeroy J, Wareham NJ, Ekelund U, Brage S, Franks PW. PLoS ONE. 2011; 6(7):e22922

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0022922

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This publication compares the validity of objective measures of physical activity energy expenditure in pregnant and non-pregnant Swedish women using a wrist-worn GENEA and tests acceptability of a wrist worn device. Pregnant and non-pregnant women wore a GENEA on their non-dominant wrist for 10 days. During this time doubly labelled water was used to assess total energy expenditure. British participants wore the accelerometer on their non-dominant wrist and hip for 7 days and scored the acceptability of the unit placement (1-10). A data summary measure derived from wrist-worn GENEA data adds significantly to the prediction of energy expenditure and wearing of the unit is scored acceptable by participants.

Accelerometer Counts and Raw Acceleration Output in Relation to Mechanical Loading

Rowlands AV, and Stiles VH. (2012). J Biomech. 2012; Feb 2;45(3):448-454

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.jbiomech.com/article/S0021-9290(11)00769-X/abstract

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This paper investigates the relationship of accelerometer output, in counts (ActiGraph GT1M) and as raw accelerations (ActiGraph GT3X+ and GENEA), with ground reaction force in adults. Participants (N=10) performed eight trials each consisting of slow walk, brisk walk, slow run, faster running and box drops. Ground reaction force data were collected for walking and running. Jumps were performed on a force plate. Three accelerometers were worn by each participant; GT1M, GT3X+ and GENEA were worn at the hip. A GT3X+ and GENEA were also worn on the left and right wrists respectively. GT1M counts correlated with peak impact force, average resultant force and peak loading rate. GENEA and GT3X+ accelerations correlated with average resultant force and peak loading rate, at hip and wrist.

As both accelerometer counts and raw acceleration outputs correlate with ground reaction force, this may be appropriate for the quantification of activity beneficial to bone. Wrist-worn monitors may be a viable option for future bone health studies.

Physical Activity Classification using the GENEA Wrist-Worn Accelerometer

Zhang S, Rowlands AV, Murray P, Hurst, TL. Med Sci Sport Exerc. 2012; Apr;44(4):742-8

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/2012/04000/Physical_Activity_Classification_Using_the_GENEA.22.aspx

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This paper describes methods developed to classify physical activities into walking, running, household or sedentary activities based on raw acceleration data from the GENEA and compares classification accuracy from a wrist-worn GENEA with a waist worn GENEA.

Three GENEA accelerometers were worn by each subject during data collection; one at the waist, left wrist and right wrist. Data were collected at 80Hz. Features were extracted from raw data using  fast Fourier transform and wavelet decomposition. Machine-learning algorithms were used to classify running, walking, household and sedentary daily activities. The results state that the developed algorithms can accurately classify the activities of daily living. Classification accuracy of 0.99 for waist-worn GENEA, right wrist (0.97) and left wrist (0.96). This performance is comparable to waist-worn accelerometers for the assessment of physical activity.

Activity Classification using the GENEA: Optimum Sampling Frequency and Number of Axes

Zhang S, Murray P, Zillmer R, Eston RG, Catt M, Rowlands AV. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012; Nov;44(11):2228-34

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/2012/11000/Activity_Classification_Using_the_GENEA___Optimum.24.aspx

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Previous analysis has shown that the GENEA  shows high classification accuracy of sedentary, house, walking and running activities when sampled at 80Hz. This paper compares the classification rate of activities on the basis of data from single axis, two axes and 3 axes, sampling rates ranging from 5 to 80 Hz (5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 Hz). Ten to twelve activities were completed by 60 subjects whilst wearing a GENEA accelerometer on the right wrist.   Mathematical models were built based on features extracted from the mean, SD, fast Fourier transform and wavelet decomposition, which combined with one of the sampling rates to classify physical activities into sedentary, household, walking and running. Classification accuracy was high, irrespective of number of axes at 80, 40, 20 and 10 Hz but dropped for data collected at 5Hz (94.98 %).

Lower sampling rates and measurement of a single axis would result in lower data load (and hence, higher efficiency of data processing), and longer battery life. Sampling frequencies greater than 10Hz and one / more axis of measurement were not associated with greater classification accuracy.

Cohort Profile: The Cork and Kerry Diabetes and Heart Disease Study

Kearney PM, Harrington JM, McCarthy VJC, Fitzgerald AP, Perry I. Int. J. Epidemiol. 2012;1-10

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/09/14/ije.dys131.long

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This publication provides a description of the Cork and Kerry study and subject cohort (Irish adult). The original first phase of the study was carried out in 1998 and was a large population-based observational study to estimate the prevalence of major CVD risk factors in a middle aged population. Phase II of the Study commenced in 2008. A new cohort (Mitchelstown) was recruited in 2010-11. The later stage of this included an objective measure of physical activity using the GENEActiv accelerometer. Approximately 464 participants wore the GENEAtciv for 7 days. These data will be used to estimate daily metabolic activity, sleep-wake cycles and to assess the relationship between sleep patterns and health outcomes.

Sleep Estimates Using Microelectrical mechanical Systems (MEMS)

te Lindert BHW and Van Someren ELW. Sleep 2013;36(5):781-789

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journalsleep.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=28938

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Currently detailed seep analyses rely on polysomnography (PSG) measures. Whilst PSG is seen as the gold standard, it is costly and time consuming and is therefore unsuitable for use in large scale cohorts. More cost effective, yet a step down in precision is actigraphy ie, the recording of wrist movements with a small, solid state recorder. Often these actigraphy units measure in defined epochs and often in a single uni-axis. Incorporating tri axial accelerometers into microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) allows longer duration data recording at a much higher frequency (for example, GENEActiv). The described study compares count based sleep data collector (Actiwatch) with MEMS-accelerometery (GENEActiv).

Fifteen participants wore two Actiwatches (15 sec epochs) and two GENEActiv units on the non-dominant wrist overnight (50Hz sampling frequency). Only the z-axis of the GENEActiv data were used as this corresponds to the most sensitive axis of the Actiwatch. Passing-Bablok regression was used to optimise transformation of the GENEActiv MEMS signals to movement counts. Kappa statistics calculated agreement between individual epochs scored as wake or sleep. Bland-Altman plots evaluated reliability of common sleep variables between Actiwatch and GENEActiv.

This study optimised and validated a data-processing algorithm that allows data to be pooled from an Actiwatch unit and a GENEActiv (MEMS) accelerometer. It is suggested that more reliable sleep parameters may be obtained using MEMS-accelerometers than from actigraphs.

Classification Accuracy of the Wrist-Worn GENEA Accelerometer

Welch WA, Bassett DR, Thompson DL, Freedson PS, Staudenmayer JW, John D, Steeves JA, Conger SA, Ceaser T, Howe CA, Sasaki JE, Fitzhugh EC. Med Sci Sports Exerc 44(4):742-748, April 2013

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/publishahead/Classification_Accuracy_of_the_Wrist_Worn_GENEA.98366.aspx

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This study investigated whether the published left-wrist cut-points for the GENEActiv accelerometer are accurate for predicting intensity categories during specific structured exercises. One hundred and thirty adults wore a GENEActiv on their left wrist and performed 14 different lifestyle activities, left-handed subject data were excluded.  Seven activities were completed by the subjects, from filing papers, vacuuming, self-paced, walking, treadmill walk (6.4 km/h), cycling at 49 watts, basketball practice, treadmill run (9.6km/h), computer work, treadmill walk (4.8 km/h), cycling 98 watts, moving a 4.5 kg box, treadmill walk on a 5% incline (4.8 0r 6.4 km/h).

This study reports that using published cut-points that there was some misclassification of the activities performed.

Impact of Study Design on Development and Evaluation of an Activity-type Classifier

van Hees VT, Golubic R, Ekelund U, Brage S. J Appl Physiol 2013; 114:1042-1051

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://jap.physiology.org/content/114/8/1042.long

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Often methods developed to classify activities are laboratory based and may not reflect real-life situations. This paper examines how study design may impact on classifier performance in real life. Twenty eight subjects wore 9 triaxial GENEActiv accelerometers while performing 58 activities. For each sensor location, logic classifiers were trained in subsets of up to 8 activities to distinguish between walking and non-walking activities. This was then evaluated in all 58 activities. Different weighting factors were used to provide an estimation of the confusion matrix as would apply in a real-life scenario, in addition to a laboratory setting. The sensitivity of the classifier estimated with a traditional lab-based protocol was within the range of estimates derived from real-life scenarios for any body location. The specificity was over estimated by the laboratory scenario. Walking time was systematically over estimated, except by the lower back sensor.

In conclusion, classifiers developed under laboratory confined conditions may not accurately reflect classifier performance in real life. Further studies are required to evaluate activity classification methods, with respect to comparing experimental conditions to real-life conditions.

Methodological Description of Accelerometry for Measuring Physical Activity in the 1993 and 2004 Pelotas (Brazil) Birth Cohorts

Knuth AG, Assunção MC, Gonçalves H, Menezes AM, Santos IS, Barros AJ, Matijasevich A, Ramires VV, Silva IC, Hallal PC. Cad Saude Publica, 2013; Mar;29(3):557-65

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.scielosp.org/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0102-311X2013000700013&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en

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Abstract in English, main article in Portuguese.

This study characterises the physical activity methodology of data collection in two birth cohorts (2004, 1993) in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, at the 6-7 and 18  year follow-up. At follow up subjects were issued with a GENEA or GENEActiv triaxial accelerometer to be worn on the wrist for 5-8 days. Acccelerometry data was collected from 3331 children and 3816 adolescents. This study provides a framework aimed to help plan future population-based studies and to improve understanding of physical activity.

Calibration of the GENEA Accelerometer for Assessment of Physical Activity Intensity in Children

Phillips LR, Parfitt G, Rowlands AV. J Sci Med Sport 2013; Mar;16(2)124-8

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.jsams.org/article/S1440-2440(12)00112-0/abstract

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The aim of this laboratory-based study was to establish activity intensity cut-points for the GENEA accelerometer via direct calibration with oxygen consumption. Forty four children aged 8-14 completed a set of eight activities whilst wearing GENEA accelerometers at 3 body locations (each wrist and right hip). They also wore an Actigraph GT1M at the hip and a portable gas analyser. Actigraph output and maximal oxygen consumption were used for assessment of concurrent and criterion validity. Intensity cut-points were derived using ROC analysis.

The GENEA showed good criterion validity at both wrist locations (r=0.900 for right wrist, r=0.910 for left). Hip worn GENEA gave significantly higher criterion validity at r=0.965. Results were similar for concurrent validity. The paper concludes that irrespective of location, GENEA units discriminate between all activity intensities, with the hip mounted unit recording the largest area under the curve for each intensity. Wrist-worn devices have potential for higher subject compliance and cut-points for children wearing GENEA have now been presented.

Use of Accelerometry to classify activity beneficial to bone in premenopausal women

Stiles VH, Griew PJ, Rowlands AV . Med Sci Sports Exerc 2013 Dec;45(12):2353-61

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/publishahead/Use_of_accelerometry_to_classify_activity.98336.aspx

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This study aims to quantify the relationship between ground reaction force (GRF) and peak acceleration from hip and wrist-worn accelerometers and to determine peak acceleration cut-points associated with a loading rate previously demonstrated as beneficial to bone. Short bursts of dynamic activity characterised by high impact forces and loading rates have been found to increase bone mineral density in pre-menopausal women. Forty seven premenopausal women performed a range of activities whilst wearing GENEActiv and Actigraph GT3X accelerometers (sampling frequency of 100 Hz) worn on the hip and wrist. Peak vertical GRF was recorded using a force plate for 8 steps per activity. ROC curves were used to determine the optimal peak acceleration cut-points in 37 participants. These cut-points were cross validated in the remaining 10 participants. For all activities combined, peak accelerations were positively and significantly correlated with peak GRF and peak loading rate. Overall classification agreement was over 85% for both monitors worn either at the wrist or hip in the cross-validation sample. Wrist-worn accelerometers are more acceptable to study participants and thus results in greater wear-time. Both the GENEActiv and Actigraph GT3X accelerometers can be used to identify the occurrence of loading rates which may be beneficial to pre-menopausal women.

Establishing and Evaluating Wrist Cutpoints for the GENEActiv Accelerometer in Youth

Schaefer CA, Nigg CR, Hill JO, Brink LA, Browning RC. Med Sci Sports Exerc Oct. 2013; Published Ahead of Print

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/publishahead/Establishing_and_Evaluating_Wrist_Cutpoints_for.98217.aspx

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This study was designed to establish physical activity cut-points for the GENEActiv in 24 school children aged 6-11. Additionally, cut-points were applied to a free-loving sample and physical activity examined using 1 sec epochs. Children performed 9 laboratory based activities, data were collected at 75Hz and averaged into 1 second epochs. Cut-points were derived using ROC curves, these cut-points were applied to an independent sample of free living data from the Intervention of Physical Activity in Youth (IPLAY) study, where devices were worn for 6 days. Cut-points for sedentary, moderate and vigorous intensities were 0.190, 0.314 and 0.998g respectively. They found that sedentary and vigorous activity were classified with good accuracy, light and moderate less so. They conclude that selection of representative calibration activities is important, together with free-living validation.

Guide to the Assessment of Physical Activity: Clinical and Research Applications. A scientific statement from the American Heart Association

Strath SJ, Kaminsky LA, Ainsworth BE, Ekelund U, Freedson PS, Gary RN, Richardson CR, Smith DT, Swartz AM, Circulation Oct 2013 http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2013/10/14/01.cir.0000435708.67487.da.citation

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2013/10/14/01.cir.0000435708.67487.da.citation

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The aim of this paper is to determine feasibility and potential role of combining radiostereometric analysis (RSA) gait analysis and activity monitoring in the follow-up of fracture patients. Two patients with similar tibial plateau fractures were treated by open reduction internal fixation augmented with impaction bone grafting and were instructed to partial weight bear to 10 kg for the first 6 postoperative weeks. Gait analysis was performed at 1, 2, 6 and 12 weeks postoperatively. Patients wore a GENEActiv for 4 weeks between the 2 and 6 week appointments. Patient 1 increased moderate-vigorous intensity, patient 2 remained more stable. This study demonstrates the potential of using a combination of RSA, gait analysis and activity monitoring to obtain comprehensive evidence for postoperative weight bearing schedules during fracture healing.

Collecting a comprehensive evidence base to monitor fracture rehabilitation: A case study

Callary SA, Thewlis D, Rowlands AV, Findlay DM, Solomon LB. World Journal of Orthopedics 2013 Oct 18;4(4):259-266 http://www.wjgnet.com/2218-5836/full/v4/i4/259.htm

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.wjgnet.com/2218-5836/full/v4/i4/259.htm%20

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The aim of this paper is to determine feasibility and potential role of combining radiostereometric analysis (RSA) gait analysis and activity monitoring in the follow-up of fracture patients. Two patients with similar tibial plateau fractures were treated by open reduction internal fixation augmented with impaction bone grafting and were instructed to partial weight bear to 10 kg for the first 6 postoperative weeks. Gait analysis was performed at 1, 2, 6 and 12 weeks postoperatively. Patients wore a GENEActiv for 4 weeks between the 2 and 6 week appointments. Patient 1 increased moderate-vigorous intensity, patient 2 remained more stable. This study demonstrates the potential of using a combination of RSA, gait analysis and activity monitoring to obtain comprehensive evidence for postoperative weight bearing schedules during fracture healing.

Makin TR, Cramer AO, Scholz J, Hahamy A, Henderson Slater D, Tracey I, Johansen-Berg H. elife 2013;2:e01273 http://elife.elifesciences.org/content/2/e01273

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://elife.elifesciences.org/content/2/e01273

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This publication concerns arm-amputation and two drivers for brain plasticity; sensory deprivation and altered use. GENEActiv was used as part of limb-usage strategy measurements to validate prosthetic limb and stump usage questionnaires. Limb acceleration data were collected from 21 limb-absent individuals, at a sample rate of 100 Hz for 2 days. Each participant wore 2 GENEActiv units which they placed on the wrist of the intact hand or the proximal aspect of the upper arm. To account for whole body movements, as well as differences in number of hours of recordings, a ratio between the two limb movements was used, rather than absolute number of movements.

Comparison of Raw Acceleration from the GENEA and Actigraph GT3X+ Activity Monitors

John D, Sasaki J, Staudenmayer J, Mavilia M, Freedson PS. Sensors 2013, 13, 14754-63

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.mdpi.com/1424-8220/13/11/14754

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The purpose of this publication was to compare raw acceleration output of the Actigraph GT3X+ and the original prototype GENEA (not the commercially available, developed GENEActiv device). These devices were oscillated in an orbital shaker, additionally 10 subjects wore both units on the dominant wrist and performed treadmill walking and simulated free-living activities. They concluded that it may be inappropriate to apply a model developed on the prototype GENEA to predict activity type using GT3X+ data when input features are time dependent attributes of raw acceleration.

Effects of a web-based intervention on physical activity and metabolism in older adults: Randomized Controlled Trial

Wijsman CA, Westendorp RGJ, Verhagen EALM, Catt M, Slagboom E, de Craen AJM, Broekhuizen K, van Mechelen W, van Heemst D, van der Ouderaa F, Mooijaart SP. J med internet research 2013 (Nov 06);15(1):e233  www.jmir.org/2013/11/e233/

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://www.jmir.org/2013/11/e233/

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Lack of physical activity leads to changes in body composition and functional decline and increased risk of disease. This publication investigates if a Web-based intervention increases physical activity and improves metabolic health in older adults. They conducted a 3 month randomized waitlist-controlled trial in 235 inactive adults aged 60-70 years, and no diabetes. The intervention group received the Philips DirectLife internet program. At baseline and 3 month follow-up, daily physical activity was measured for 7 days using both ankle and wrist-worn GENEActiv at a measurement frequency of 85.7 Hz. Physical activity measured at both the ankle and wrist increased over the control group, as did insulin and HbA1c. This study shows that in inactive older adults, a 3 month Web-based intervention increased physical activity and improved metabolic health outcomes. Such web-based interventions provide opportunities for large scale programs for prevention of metabolic dysregulation.

Assessing Sedentary Behavior with the GENEActiv: Introducing the Sedentary Sphere

Rowlands AV, Olds TS, Hillsdon M, Pulsford R, Hurst TL, Eston RG, Gomersall SJ, Johnston K, Langford J. Med Sci Sports Exerc Nov. 2013; Published Ahead of Print

The complete abstract can be viewed or publication purchased here:
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/publishahead/Assessing_Sedentary_Behavior_with_the_GENEActiv__.98196.aspx

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The Sedentary Sphere is a methodology for the analysis, identification and visual presentation of sedentary behaviours from a wrist-worn triaxial accelerometer. This publication introduces the concept of the Sedentary Sphere and determination of the accuracy of posture classification from wrist accelerometer data. In addition to measuring sedentary activity, many researchers would like to know more about what the individual sedentary behaviours are and the postures associated with them. The GENEActiv was selected as wrist-worn monitors lead to high compliance.

Three different samples were used;

  • Free living (N=13, aged 20-60)
  • Laboratory-based (N=25, aged 30-65)
  • Hospital in-patients (N=10, 60-90)

All three groups wore GENEActiv on wrist and activPAL on thigh. Additionally, the free-living sample wore a GENEActiv on the thigh and completed the MARCA (multimedia activity recall for children and adults). The laboratory-based sample wore the monitors while sat at a desk for 7 hours, which included 2 minutes of walking every 20 minutes. In-patient and free-living groups wore devices for 24 h.

The MARCA is a recall tool that was used to determine periods when specific activities were undertaken, this allowed the investigation into the accuracy of posture allocation in specific contexts and plot specified types of behavior on the sedentary sphere. The activPAL served as the criterion measure of sitting time for all 3 samples. Sittimg time did not differ in the free-living sample between GENEActiv and activPAL. This was correlated in the 3 samples combined. Mean intra-individual agreement was 85+-7%. In the laboratory group and in-patients, sitting time was underestimated by the wrist GENEActiv by 30 min and by 2 h relative to activPAL.

All of these activities were plotted onto the Sedentary Sphere which enables determination of the most likely body posture from the wrist-worn GENEActiv. The Sedentary Sphere facilitates visualization of sedentary behaviours from the pattern of wrist movement and positions within that behaviour.